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Making custom moulds
How I use the Mayku formbox to make my own food moulds

Video

Here's a video showing you how the formbox works. Check below for the detailed method.


Most, if not all pastry chefs use moulds in their work. They enable you to present your work in seemingly impossible ways, over and over again, identically every time. How else can you present an apple mousse in the form of its raw ingredient, or get a perfectly smooth surface on an entremet for mirror glazing?

There are thousands of excellent moulds on the market, made from silicone, plastic or metal. Nearly any shape you can imagine is out there for sale. But what if your work is so unique, so different, that you simply can't find the moulds you want? You have to make your own.

I've been making my own moulds for a couple of years now using silicone putty and the results have been fantastic. It's enabled me to make realistic jelly worms, satsumas, spray can lids and lots more. Here's the product I use. This is just fine on a small scale, but what if you need more than one of the same design? That's where the Mayku formbox comes in.


The formbox is a tabletop vacuum former, for use both domestically and professionally. Using it couldn't be simpler. You plug your hoover pipe in the back, turn the machine on and wait for the element to heat up. Once it's hot enough (the machine will tell you) you clip in a plastic moulding sheet (Mayku sell these and they're dirt cheap), heat it up till pliable (again, the formbox will tell you when) and put the thing you are going to mould onto the grill plate at the bottom. All that's left to do is pull the top tray down and your hoover will automatically kick in, sucking the moulding sheet around your object with hairline accuracy. 10 seconds later you've got your mould! Watch the process here


What can you mould?

Pretty much anything. As long as your object is firm enough to be moulded round, you can give anything a go. It must be noted that what every you are moulding can't have a tucked under lip, as you won't be able to remove it from the plastic sheet once moulded. For example, if you wanted to make a mould of an apple, you'll have to cut it in half and place the flat sides down. If you were to try a whole apple, you'll be left with a plastic wrapped fruit trapped inside the sheet.


What can you set in your newly made mould?

Most desserts can be made in your plastic mould, from chocolate to mousse to parfait. The material is freezer and fridge safe, however it can't be baked in (it'll just melt!)


How I moulded the chicken breast

To make my chicken breast dessert , I had to make a mould of a raw piece of chicken. I didn't feel comfortable doing this in my Mayku so I had to be inventive. I used the silicone putty I mentioned above to make a silicone chicken breast shape, then simply moulded around that.

To use silicone putty couldn't be simpler. In the box you get two packets of different coloured putty. You mix equal weights of each putty together until a uniform colour is achieved, then either mould around the object you want (if using it to make a food mould) or shape it by hand into the design you want to use in your formbox. Watch an example


The Food Illusionist. Challenging perceptions of food and taste with desserts. His recipes are accessible and achievable to everyone, from the home cook to the professional. Author of Food Illusions out now worldwide. Use your Illusions out this year.

More from me
favorite
print
rate
Making custom moulds
How I use the Mayku formbox to make my own food moulds

Video

Here's a video showing you how the formbox works. Check below for the detailed method.


Most, if not all pastry chefs use moulds in their work. They enable you to present your work in seemingly impossible ways, over and over again, identically every time. How else can you present an apple mousse in the form of its raw ingredient, or get a perfectly smooth surface on an entremet for mirror glazing?

There are thousands of excellent moulds on the market, made from silicone, plastic or metal. Nearly any shape you can imagine is out there for sale. But what if your work is so unique, so different, that you simply can't find the moulds you want? You have to make your own.

I've been making my own moulds for a couple of years now using silicone putty and the results have been fantastic. It's enabled me to make realistic jelly worms, satsumas, spray can lids and lots more. Here's the product I use. This is just fine on a small scale, but what if you need more than one of the same design? That's where the Mayku formbox comes in.


The formbox is a tabletop vacuum former, for use both domestically and professionally. Using it couldn't be simpler. You plug your hoover pipe in the back, turn the machine on and wait for the element to heat up. Once it's hot enough (the machine will tell you) you clip in a plastic moulding sheet (Mayku sell these and they're dirt cheap), heat it up till pliable (again, the formbox will tell you when) and put the thing you are going to mould onto the grill plate at the bottom. All that's left to do is pull the top tray down and your hoover will automatically kick in, sucking the moulding sheet around your object with hairline accuracy. 10 seconds later you've got your mould! Watch the process here


What can you mould?

Pretty much anything. As long as your object is firm enough to be moulded round, you can give anything a go. It must be noted that what every you are moulding can't have a tucked under lip, as you won't be able to remove it from the plastic sheet once moulded. For example, if you wanted to make a mould of an apple, you'll have to cut it in half and place the flat sides down. If you were to try a whole apple, you'll be left with a plastic wrapped fruit trapped inside the sheet.


What can you set in your newly made mould?

Most desserts can be made in your plastic mould, from chocolate to mousse to parfait. The material is freezer and fridge safe, however it can't be baked in (it'll just melt!)


How I moulded the chicken breast

To make my chicken breast dessert , I had to make a mould of a raw piece of chicken. I didn't feel comfortable doing this in my Mayku so I had to be inventive. I used the silicone putty I mentioned above to make a silicone chicken breast shape, then simply moulded around that.

To use silicone putty couldn't be simpler. In the box you get two packets of different coloured putty. You mix equal weights of each putty together until a uniform colour is achieved, then either mould around the object you want (if using it to make a food mould) or shape it by hand into the design you want to use in your formbox. Watch an example


The Food Illusionist. Challenging perceptions of food and taste with desserts. His recipes are accessible and achievable to everyone, from the home cook to the professional. Author of Food Illusions out now worldwide. Use your Illusions out this year.

More from me
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