HOMEMADE PITTA BREAD HOMEMADE PITTA BREAD
Prep 30 minutes
Total 1 hour 45 minutes
Serves Pittas
US | Metric
Ingredients
Pitta Bread Dough
  • 400 g bakers bread flour
  • 100 g wholewheat flour
  • 8 g caster sugar
  • 6 g salt
  • 10 g dry (instant) yeast
  • 350 ml warm water
  • 10 ml olive oil
  • 20 g fresh yeast (if not using dry yeast)

HOMEMADE PITTA BREAD

Notes:


-       We use strong bakers flour (bread flour) because of its high gluten content.  This helps develop the dough’s elasticity and rise when baking.

-       We have introduced using alternative flours like whole-wheat because of its improved nutritional content, but if unavailable, you can easily do this whole recipe with just bread flour or regular plain (all-purpose) flour.

-       It is possible to freeze your pitta bread if you’ve made more than you need – they keep well. After freezing, when needed just pop them into a toaster and they will be ready to eat!

-       We prefer to use fresh yeast but it is difficult to find if you’re a home baker (not buying wholesale), so we have included dry/instant yeast measurements and methods as well.

-       It is important for you to check your dough during its resting/rising stages. It is difficult for us to give exact timings at every stage because there are many uncontrollable variables that will affect your dough such as temperature, moisture in the air, freshness of the yeast, etc. However, proving (at each stage) generally takes around 1-2 hours.

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For the dough with dried yeast:

Start by placing your dry yeast into a bowl with warm water that is lukewarm (about 40 c). Add your caster sugar and mix with your fingers. Leave this and let it sit until a foam-like texture forms on the top – this signals the yeast is activated.


In a bowl of a standing mixer, mix together the flour and salt. Start mixing with the dough hook attachment and slowly add the warm water/yeast mixture a little at a time. Continue to mix at medium speed until the dough comes together and has a smooth and tight look to its texture.


Now, add the oil into your mixer and continue to mix at medium speed. Adding the oil will make the dough look overly wet and like it will never come together but have faith, it eventually will. Continue to mix at medium speed and the final dough will be a nice smooth texture.


Roughly form dough into a little ball using a scraper. Cover the dough with cling film and allow it to rest till it triples in its size (you can mark the side of the bowl just to make sure). At this stage, if you want to bake the bread the following day, you can let your dough rest in the fridge overnight. This will actually improve the dough flavor and elasticity. If you are prepared to bake on the same day, then allow your dough to rest for an hour at room temperature.


For the dough with fresh yeast:

In a bowl of a standing mixer, place half of the flour, sugar and salt. Add the remaining amount of flour on top and then crumble the fresh yeast over this. This technique makes sure the yeast does not touch the salt.

*Note: Salt actually slows down the activation of yeast. This is why it is important for any type of bread mixture to avoid placing yeast next to salt.


Start mixing ingredients with the dough hook attachment at medium speed. Continue until the dough comes together with a smooth and tight texture. Now, add the oil into your mixer and continue to mix at medium speed. Adding the oil will make the dough look overly wet and like it will never come together but have faith, it eventually will. Continue to mix at medium speed and the final dough will be a nice smooth texture.


Roughly form dough into a little ball using a scraper. Cover the dough with cling film and allow it to rest till it triples in its size (you can mark the side of the bowl just to make sure). At this stage, if you want to bake the bread the following day, you can let your dough rest in the fridge overnight. This will actually improve the dough flavor and elasticity. If you are prepared to bake on the same day, then allow your dough to rest for an hour at room temperature.


For shaping and rolling the dough:

Preheat your oven to its highest setting (we set ours at 250 c) and place a flat tray in the middle of the oven. If you have a baking stone, this would be more ideal.


Once the dough is 3x its size, gently release the dough from the bowl by scraping down the sides with a scraper. Pour onto a floured surface. Portion the dough into 80 g dough balls – you should get ten. Roll each dough ball in a circular motion between your palm and the surface on your table until it has a smooth exterior and a tight ball has formed. Place each ball onto a floured surface or tray with space between. Set aside to rest for 15-25 minutes.

*Resting the dough balls will allow the gluten to rest before shaping.


At this point, your oven should be hot and ready. Flour your work section and begin rolling out each dough ball with a rolling pin. Roll until it is about 0.5-1cm. You can flip your dough as you are rolling to make sure it is not sticking to the table (if it is, add more flour to your work area).



For baking the dough:

Now that your dough balls are rolled out, very carefully place them flat on your hot tray left inside the heating oven. You can use a wide spatula to lift the dough and prevent it from losing its shape. We typically bake two at a time to make sure there is enough space. Quickly shut the oven door to avoid loss of heat.


The pitta bread will only take 2-3 minutes to puff up and finish baking depending on your oven temperature. You do not need to flip the pittas during baking. Once baked, take your tray out and remove them from the tray. Leave baked pittas on a wire rack and leave to cool slightly. When warm, move into a tray with a cloth and cover them to prevent them from drying out.


  

When finished, enjoy with any homemade dips and spreads!


These pitta breads can last in a tight container or sealed ziplock bag for a few days. Alternatively, if you have made too much, you can freeze them in a sealed bag as well.  



HOMEMADE PITTA BREAD HOMEMADE PITTA BREAD

HOMEMADE PITTA BREAD

Notes:


-       We use strong bakers flour (bread flour) because of its high gluten content.  This helps develop the dough’s elasticity and rise when baking.

-       We have introduced using alternative flours like whole-wheat because of its improved nutritional content, but if unavailable, you can easily do this whole recipe with just bread flour or regular plain (all-purpose) flour.

-       It is possible to freeze your pitta bread if you’ve made more than you need – they keep well. After freezing, when needed just pop them into a toaster and they will be ready to eat!

-       We prefer to use fresh yeast but it is difficult to find if you’re a home baker (not buying wholesale), so we have included dry/instant yeast measurements and methods as well.

-       It is important for you to check your dough during its resting/rising stages. It is difficult for us to give exact timings at every stage because there are many uncontrollable variables that will affect your dough such as temperature, moisture in the air, freshness of the yeast, etc. However, proving (at each stage) generally takes around 1-2 hours.

favorite
print
like
Prep 30 minutes
Total 1 hour 45 minutes
Serves Pittas
US | Metric
Ingredients
Pitta Bread Dough
  • 400 g bakers bread flour
  • 100 g wholewheat flour
  • 8 g caster sugar
  • 6 g salt
  • 10 g dry (instant) yeast
  • 350 ml warm water
  • 10 ml olive oil
  • 20 g fresh yeast (if not using dry yeast)

For the dough with dried yeast:

Start by placing your dry yeast into a bowl with warm water that is lukewarm (about 40 c). Add your caster sugar and mix with your fingers. Leave this and let it sit until a foam-like texture forms on the top – this signals the yeast is activated.


In a bowl of a standing mixer, mix together the flour and salt. Start mixing with the dough hook attachment and slowly add the warm water/yeast mixture a little at a time. Continue to mix at medium speed until the dough comes together and has a smooth and tight look to its texture.


Now, add the oil into your mixer and continue to mix at medium speed. Adding the oil will make the dough look overly wet and like it will never come together but have faith, it eventually will. Continue to mix at medium speed and the final dough will be a nice smooth texture.


Roughly form dough into a little ball using a scraper. Cover the dough with cling film and allow it to rest till it triples in its size (you can mark the side of the bowl just to make sure). At this stage, if you want to bake the bread the following day, you can let your dough rest in the fridge overnight. This will actually improve the dough flavor and elasticity. If you are prepared to bake on the same day, then allow your dough to rest for an hour at room temperature.


For the dough with fresh yeast:

In a bowl of a standing mixer, place half of the flour, sugar and salt. Add the remaining amount of flour on top and then crumble the fresh yeast over this. This technique makes sure the yeast does not touch the salt.

*Note: Salt actually slows down the activation of yeast. This is why it is important for any type of bread mixture to avoid placing yeast next to salt.


Start mixing ingredients with the dough hook attachment at medium speed. Continue until the dough comes together with a smooth and tight texture. Now, add the oil into your mixer and continue to mix at medium speed. Adding the oil will make the dough look overly wet and like it will never come together but have faith, it eventually will. Continue to mix at medium speed and the final dough will be a nice smooth texture.


Roughly form dough into a little ball using a scraper. Cover the dough with cling film and allow it to rest till it triples in its size (you can mark the side of the bowl just to make sure). At this stage, if you want to bake the bread the following day, you can let your dough rest in the fridge overnight. This will actually improve the dough flavor and elasticity. If you are prepared to bake on the same day, then allow your dough to rest for an hour at room temperature.


For shaping and rolling the dough:

Preheat your oven to its highest setting (we set ours at 250 c) and place a flat tray in the middle of the oven. If you have a baking stone, this would be more ideal.


Once the dough is 3x its size, gently release the dough from the bowl by scraping down the sides with a scraper. Pour onto a floured surface. Portion the dough into 80 g dough balls – you should get ten. Roll each dough ball in a circular motion between your palm and the surface on your table until it has a smooth exterior and a tight ball has formed. Place each ball onto a floured surface or tray with space between. Set aside to rest for 15-25 minutes.

*Resting the dough balls will allow the gluten to rest before shaping.


At this point, your oven should be hot and ready. Flour your work section and begin rolling out each dough ball with a rolling pin. Roll until it is about 0.5-1cm. You can flip your dough as you are rolling to make sure it is not sticking to the table (if it is, add more flour to your work area).



For baking the dough:

Now that your dough balls are rolled out, very carefully place them flat on your hot tray left inside the heating oven. You can use a wide spatula to lift the dough and prevent it from losing its shape. We typically bake two at a time to make sure there is enough space. Quickly shut the oven door to avoid loss of heat.


The pitta bread will only take 2-3 minutes to puff up and finish baking depending on your oven temperature. You do not need to flip the pittas during baking. Once baked, take your tray out and remove them from the tray. Leave baked pittas on a wire rack and leave to cool slightly. When warm, move into a tray with a cloth and cover them to prevent them from drying out.


  

When finished, enjoy with any homemade dips and spreads!


These pitta breads can last in a tight container or sealed ziplock bag for a few days. Alternatively, if you have made too much, you can freeze them in a sealed bag as well.