favorite
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rate
Prep 6 hours
Total 4 hours
Serves
US | Metric
Ingredients
For the terrine
  • 4 Mallard legs
  • 2 Quail breasts
  • 2 Partridge breasts
  • 200 ml Chicken stock
  • 3 Gelatine leaves (bronze)
  • 2 Carrots
  • 10 ml White wine vinegar
  • 100 g Duck or goose fat
  • 5 g Juniper berries
  • 2 Whole star anise
  • Sherry vinegar
For the mayonnaise
  • 3 Chicken eggs
  • 15 g Curry powder
  • 80 ml Rapeseed oil
  • 10 ml White wine vinegar
For the eggs
  • 12 Quail eggs
For the garnish
  • 1 Bag watercress
  • 1 Loaf crusty bread
Game Terrine Game Terrine

Game Terrine

Next time you have friends over for dinner, blow them away with this beautifully rich terrine. Keep it simple by serving with rustic bread and watercress or – for a real showstopper – rustle up your own curry mayonnaise and soft-boiled quail eggs.


Place the mallard legs in an ovenproof dish and cover with vegetable oil, then put the oven at 90℃ and set to cook for 4 hours. While you wait for the mallard, pan fry the quail for 2 minutes at around 180℃ to seal both sides. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.


Roast the partridge breasts with the butter and star anise for 10 minutes at around 180℃. Once cooked, drain the fat into a pan, and allow to cool. Pick off all the meat from the bone, taking care not to add any gristle or bone, and tip the meat into a mixing bowl.


Heat the chicken stock in a pan, and soak the gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water.


Slice the pheasant and quail thinly, mix with the mallard meat and season with salt and pepper. Add the sherry vinegar and juniper berries.


Make long strips of carrot using a vegetable peeler, then add the carrot strips and the softened gelatine to the hot chicken stock. Allow the carrots to soften slightly, then remove and pour the stock over the meat mix. You should be left with a seasoned wet game mix and partially cooked carrot strips.


Line a loaf tin with cling film, leaving excess to fold over the edges. Layer a portion of the meat mix over the bottom of the tin, followed by a layer of carrot, then meat, repeating the process until the tin is almost full. At this point, wrap the excess cling film over the top of the terrine. Place the second loaf tin on top to act as a weight.


Wrap both tins together with cling film to press the terrine. Put this in the fridge to set with a weight on top for at least 4 hours - ideally, leave it overnight.


If you're making the mayonnaise, bring a pan of water to a rolling simmer and soft boil the 3 chicken eggs for 4 minutes 30 seconds. Take off the heat, and submerge the eggs in icy water.


Dry fry the curry powder in a pan, and then add the rapeseed oil. Stir, then set to one side to cool.


Peel the soft-boiled eggs and blend on a slow speed with the white wine vinegar and a pinch of salt. Add the curry oil until the mixture thickens and starts to look like mayonnaise. If it doesn't seem thick enough, slowly add more vegetable oil until it's the right consistency.


Now, prepare the quail eggs. They're fragile and cook rapidly, so bring a large pan of water to a fast boil and set up a bowl of cold water with ice cubes next to the hob. Get a timer ready for 2 minutes 20 seconds, drop the eggs into the water and set the timer to go.


Once the timer goes off, scoop out the eggs with a slotted spoon and drop them into the icy water. Gently peel the eggs once they're cool, store in a container and put them in the fridge for later. Don't worry if you lose some of the eggs; we've suggested 12 so that you still have enough if any break or are overcooked.


On each plate, serve a piece of terrine around 2 cm thick, a quail egg (slice off the base to make it stand on its end) and a spoonful of curry mayonnaise.


To finish, garnish the whole dish with a handful of watercress and chunks of rustic bread.

Game Terrine Game Terrine

Game Terrine

Next time you have friends over for dinner, blow them away with this beautifully rich terrine. Keep it simple by serving with rustic bread and watercress or – for a real showstopper – rustle up your own curry mayonnaise and soft-boiled quail eggs.

favorite
print
rate
Prep 6 hours
Total 4 hours
Serves
US | Metric
Ingredients
For the terrine
  • 4 Mallard legs
  • 2 Quail breasts
  • 2 Partridge breasts
  • 200 ml Chicken stock
  • 3 Gelatine leaves (bronze)
  • 2 Carrots
  • 10 ml White wine vinegar
  • 100 g Duck or goose fat
  • 5 g Juniper berries
  • 2 Whole star anise
  • Sherry vinegar
For the mayonnaise
  • 3 Chicken eggs
  • 15 g Curry powder
  • 80 ml Rapeseed oil
  • 10 ml White wine vinegar
For the eggs
  • 12 Quail eggs
For the garnish
  • 1 Bag watercress
  • 1 Loaf crusty bread

Place the mallard legs in an ovenproof dish and cover with vegetable oil, then put the oven at 90℃ and set to cook for 4 hours. While you wait for the mallard, pan fry the quail for 2 minutes at around 180℃ to seal both sides. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.


Roast the partridge breasts with the butter and star anise for 10 minutes at around 180℃. Once cooked, drain the fat into a pan, and allow to cool. Pick off all the meat from the bone, taking care not to add any gristle or bone, and tip the meat into a mixing bowl.


Heat the chicken stock in a pan, and soak the gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water.


Slice the pheasant and quail thinly, mix with the mallard meat and season with salt and pepper. Add the sherry vinegar and juniper berries.


Make long strips of carrot using a vegetable peeler, then add the carrot strips and the softened gelatine to the hot chicken stock. Allow the carrots to soften slightly, then remove and pour the stock over the meat mix. You should be left with a seasoned wet game mix and partially cooked carrot strips.


Line a loaf tin with cling film, leaving excess to fold over the edges. Layer a portion of the meat mix over the bottom of the tin, followed by a layer of carrot, then meat, repeating the process until the tin is almost full. At this point, wrap the excess cling film over the top of the terrine. Place the second loaf tin on top to act as a weight.


Wrap both tins together with cling film to press the terrine. Put this in the fridge to set with a weight on top for at least 4 hours - ideally, leave it overnight.


If you're making the mayonnaise, bring a pan of water to a rolling simmer and soft boil the 3 chicken eggs for 4 minutes 30 seconds. Take off the heat, and submerge the eggs in icy water.


Dry fry the curry powder in a pan, and then add the rapeseed oil. Stir, then set to one side to cool.


Peel the soft-boiled eggs and blend on a slow speed with the white wine vinegar and a pinch of salt. Add the curry oil until the mixture thickens and starts to look like mayonnaise. If it doesn't seem thick enough, slowly add more vegetable oil until it's the right consistency.


Now, prepare the quail eggs. They're fragile and cook rapidly, so bring a large pan of water to a fast boil and set up a bowl of cold water with ice cubes next to the hob. Get a timer ready for 2 minutes 20 seconds, drop the eggs into the water and set the timer to go.


Once the timer goes off, scoop out the eggs with a slotted spoon and drop them into the icy water. Gently peel the eggs once they're cool, store in a container and put them in the fridge for later. Don't worry if you lose some of the eggs; we've suggested 12 so that you still have enough if any break or are overcooked.


On each plate, serve a piece of terrine around 2 cm thick, a quail egg (slice off the base to make it stand on its end) and a spoonful of curry mayonnaise.


To finish, garnish the whole dish with a handful of watercress and chunks of rustic bread.