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Prep 40 hours
Total 1 hour

Cornish Pasty

Traditional Cornish Pasty

Street food I feel should be delicious and ready to go, and what's better than the Cornish Pasty, packaged full of deliciousness and even has it own little handle in the crust, the best bit I feel.


There are plenty of tales about the the Cornish Oggy the staple for many a tin miner, most debateable put fun any way. apple pie at one end and then the steak filling at the other lunch and desert all in one, never to eat the crimp as this was used to keep arsenic away from the filling. Oggy Oggy was shouted when the wives would throw the pasty down the mine shafts, all good fun.


The only thing you have to remember NEVER put Carrot in your pasty.


This is the recipe I use and was shared by my dad who was head baker for Mrs Jenkins sadly closed and then Ivor Dewdney's who I think is still around in Devon and Cornwall.


I would go to the factory on a Saturday morning and watch the ladies chatter and crimp the pasty's by hand they were so quick

Serves
US|Metric
ingredients

Pastry

  • 500 g strong bread flour (it is important to use a stronger flour than normal as you need the extra strength in the gluten to produce strong pliable pastry)
  • 120 g lard or white shortening
  • 125 g butter
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 175 ml cold water

filling

  • 400 g good quality beef skirt, cut into cubes
  • 300 g potato, peeled and diced a waxy spud like marris Piper or Wilja
  • 150 g swede/turnip*, peeled and diced
  • 150 g onion, peeled and sliced
  • Salt & white pepper to taste
  • Beaten egg or milk to glaze

Cornish Pasty

Traditional Cornish Pasty

Street food I feel should be delicious and ready to go, and what's better than the Cornish Pasty, packaged full of deliciousness and even has it own little handle in the crust, the best bit I feel.


There are plenty of tales about the the Cornish Oggy the staple for many a tin miner, most debateable put fun any way. apple pie at one end and then the steak filling at the other lunch and desert all in one, never to eat the crimp as this was used to keep arsenic away from the filling. Oggy Oggy was shouted when the wives would throw the pasty down the mine shafts, all good fun.


The only thing you have to remember NEVER put Carrot in your pasty.


This is the recipe I use and was shared by my dad who was head baker for Mrs Jenkins sadly closed and then Ivor Dewdney's who I think is still around in Devon and Cornwall.


I would go to the factory on a Saturday morning and watch the ladies chatter and crimp the pasty's by hand they were so quick

  1. Add the salt to the flour in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Rub the two types of fat lightly into flour until it resembles breadcrumbs.
  3. Add water, bring the mixture together and knead until the pastry becomes elastic. This will take longer than normal pastry but it gives the pastry the strength that is needed to hold the filling and retain a good shape. This can also be done in a food mixer.
  4. Cover with cling film and leave to rest for 3 hours in the fridge. This is a very important stage as it is almost impossible to roll and shape the pastry when fresh.
  5. Roll out the pastry and cut into circles approx. 20cm diameter. A side plate is an ideal size to use as a guide.
  6. Layer the vegetables and meat on top of the pastry, adding plenty of seasoning as you go. The amount of salt and pepper to use will vary according to taste but a good rule of thumb is to use a good pinch of salt and a gentle pinch of pepper on each layer. 
  7. Bring the pastry around and crimp the edges together
  8. Glaze with beaten egg or an egg and milk mixture.
  9. Bake at 165 degrees C (fan oven) for about 50 – 55 minutes until golden.


You see there is no added gravy or sauce, the steam that is produced is plenty enough for a lush juicy Pasty, As we would say Proper Job